ITT

Caleb Cox
Caleb Cox

Simple, they don't. Gasses have different solubility properties and leave water at different rates under different conditions. CO2 get released en masse because the increase in temperature and the general pollution of the oceans makes it increasingly acidic and causes certain rocks (CaCO2 I think) to release the CO2 that makes up it's chemical structure. Most of the Earth's CO2 is stored in those rocks and the O2, N2, etc. Emissions from the ocean are pretty much negligible

Eli Campbell
Eli Campbell

You're retarded. The average amount of time a molecule of water remains in the atmosphere as water is 7 days. The average amount of time a molecule of CO2 remains in the atmosphere as CO2 is 10,000 years. CO2 has two double bonds that makes it mostly inert

Ryan Diaz
Ryan Diaz

When they [CO2 and methane] were reduced, the global climate became colder.
When did that happen? For how long the decrease of these gases happened? You said before that

CO2 stays in the atmosphere for millions of years.

When CO2 levels jumped rapidly, the global warming that resulted was highly disruptive and sometimes caused mass extinctions.
When? So to decrease it's percentage it takes millions of years but to increase it can "jump rapidly"?

Humans today are emitting prodigious quantities of CO2, at a rate faster than even the most destructive climate changes in earth's past.
Which destructive climate changes in the past?

Lucas Martinez
Lucas Martinez

Literally thousands of laboratory experiments have conclusively demonstrated that plants release all the CO2 they pull out of the atmosphere when they die and decompose

Samuel Richardson
Samuel Richardson

Heal also rises, so it makes sense that the hot air is all in the top hemisphere.

Thomas Anderson
Thomas Anderson

You have literally no understanding of chemistry

Jayden Baker
Jayden Baker

episode of human migration
WTF?

Eli Collins
Eli Collins

xkcd.com/1732/

Blake Hall
Blake Hall

Then the CO2 ends up being by absorbed, right?
I don't think 10,000 years is a correct average time for the absortion of CO2, since during each year the average change in the CO2 is 1%.

Thomas Cruz
Thomas Cruz

You do realize we are due for another ice age soon right?

Landon King
Landon King

When
At the end of the Permian, Triassic, or mid-Cambrian periods. The symptoms from those events (a big, rapid jump in global temperatures, rising sea levels, and ocean acidification) are all happening today with human-caused climate change.

So yes, the climate has changed before humans, and in most cases scientists know why. In all cases we see the same association between CO2 levels and global temperatures. And past examples of rapid carbon emissions (just like today) were generally highly destructive to life on Earth.

to decrease it's percentage it takes millions of years but to increase it can "jump rapidly"?
In geologic terms the past increases were rapid. Today humans are pumping CO2 into the atmosphere at an even faster rate than the fastest natural processes are capable of doing.

Lucas Jones
Lucas Jones

... b-bait, right?
I mean, nobody is this retarded and still able to post.

Nicholas Flores
Nicholas Flores

Try Google if critical thought is too much for you

John Thompson
John Thompson

The symptoms from those events
Okay, what about the causes? Volcanos, changes due to the Sun's cycles or as you're trying to prove, a sudden change of CO2 in the atmosphere?
How did this change in the CO2 concentration in atmosphere happened that it caused a warming?
Today humans are pumping CO2 into the atmosphere at an even faster rate than the fastest natural processes are capable of doing.
Which fastest natural processes?

Matthew Price
Matthew Price

Quit arguing if it's too much for you

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