The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck storytime

Welcome, ladies and gentlemen, to a storytime of Don Rosa's masterpiece: The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck, one of the best comics I've ever had the privilege to read. A historical epic spanning the course of 70 years, this story was intricately pieced together by Rosa from countless references and anecdotes from Carl Barks' legendary Scrooge McDuck comics, and tells the tale of the rise and fall of the richest duck in the world.
I'll be posting every story from both The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck and The Life and Times Companion in chronological order, including the continuity notes from the stories' original printing, and providing musical accompaniment in the form of songs from Music Inspired by the Life and Times of Scrooge, an excellent concept album by Tuomas Holopainen of Nightwish.
Shall we begin?

Other urls found in this thread:

youtube.com/watch?v=SHb3OnTUP5g
youtube.com/watch?v=EG88BtmJ6dY
youtube.com/watch?v=CEnaaYbzZyg
youtube.com/watch?v=OS_g1_LnoLQ
mega.nz/#!HIo31bIZ
mega.nz/#!HIo31bIZ!qioW83NVaanQHyNoDugjmAUi6-ui2cyTWKE4agtoLUA
youtube.com/watch?v=V1B7MBnFhdw
youtube.com/watch?v=XPPie0q0kjY
teachermuriel.eu/hotpot/duck_family_tree.jpg
youtube.com/watch?v=hDaai0z-2NY

Now, a confession: this is the first time I've ever done a storytime with Cred Forums X, so it's entirely possible that I'm going to fuck it all up. Let's hope not, eh?
Also, my phone is fucked, so I can't do the "phone trick". As such, reading bumps would be appreciated.

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I actually ordered the Don Rosa's collcetion the otjer day. All the ones that are out now anyway

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...Fuck me, I forgot to post this chapter's song. And I had it pre-prepared and all. Sorry about that.
So:
This chapter's song, "Glasgow 1877" is wistful, perhaps melancholic; and yet, it evokes adventure and hope for Scrooge's future.
youtube.com/watch?v=SHb3OnTUP5g

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And as a bonus, here's the end-of-chapter continuity and writing notes from Don Rosa.

So, the first chapter in Scrooge McDuck's life is over. But before we follow Scrooge to America, let's jump forward a few decades - and then back again. This is "part 0" of The Life and Times, and the story that gave Don Rosa the inspiration to do the rest.

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Okay, I'm thinking it's probably better to hold off on the rest of this storytime until it's not the middle of the night in Burgerland. If you're interested in me continuing, though, give the thread a bump.

I'm down for reading more of this!

Is this Cred Forums's favorite story?

I think I read this for the first time last year, you're doing great work OP.

It is a really really excellent one. I would love to see an adaptation. I can see Scrooge's... indiscretions in Africa causing trouble.

Perhaps, but I think the way that it's treated in the story - as a deeply heinous act and Scrooge's darkest moment - would probably make it acceptable. They'd probably need to redesign the tribesmen, though.

So, let's return to our story. It is 1880, and the 13-year-old Scrooge McDuck has travelled to America, in the hope of finding employment with his uncle Pothole.

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So, to recap: the year is now 1882. Scrooge is 15 years old, and is moving west in search of his fortune.
The song for this chapter, "Into the West", transitions from the wistfulness of Scrooge's early days into a faster-paced, more adventurous song, as Scrooge sets out for greater things.
youtube.com/watch?v=EG88BtmJ6dY

Reading bumps are, as ever, appreciated.

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>Don Rosa is coming to a convention close to me next month

I'm glad, but, you know, this is a storytime. Mind deleting your image?

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Hey, when you make the next thread, post a link to it in this one if you could. I'm about to fall asleep, but I'm really enjoying the story. Thanks for posting it.

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Man, this is such a good comic. Thanks for sharing it, OP.

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With Scrooge's taste for adventure piqued and a lesson about the value of hard work earned, we'll now take a minor interlude for a story from The Life and Times Companion, written some years years after the main story.

Will do!

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>Don Rosa was at a convention in my area during the holidays
>Couldn't go because I was out of town visiting family
>Apparently nobody showed up to his panel so the chances of him coming back are next to none
It's things like this that are really painful.

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YES.
Thanks user, always a pleasure re-reading this.

Jesus.

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Ha, thanks OP this is great

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It's 1883, and the young Scrooge is trying his hand at prospecting. He'll meet a mentor who'll inspire him, and (briefly) meet a future rival of his... and perhaps gain some of his famous cynicism in the process.

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Having got within a hair's breadth of making a fortune, Scrooge - now 18 years of age - is torn from it and forced to return to help his family... which of course matters far more than any riches. Right?
This chapter's song, "Duel & Cloudscapes"... well, I won't explain it for fear of spoilers. (You might want to avoid watching the video, too.)
youtube.com/watch?v=CEnaaYbzZyg

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Having decided that there's "always another rainbow", Scrooge has set out for South Africa in search of gold. And though he never realises it, he'll have his first ever meeting with his eternal nemesis...

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Another of the Companion stories, and perhaps the most famous absence from the original; it's a prequel to the Barks story "Return to Pizen Bluff". A 23-year-old Scrooge returns to the United States, and ends up with a reunion and another adventure under his belt.

Reading bumps continue to be appreciated!

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Bumperino.

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In the year 1893, Scrooge is looking for gold in the Australian desert. It's one of the more spiritual chapters of the story, with a few sly nods to the stories to be told in Scrooge's future.
The song for this chapter, Dreamtime, incorporates the didgeridoo for a genuine feeling of Aboriginal Australian spirituality.
youtube.com/watch?v=OS_g1_LnoLQ

Many thanks.

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And here we are at the apex of the story. It's 1896, and the 29-year-old Scrooge has arrived in the Klondike at the behest of the Dreamtime's message. Will he finally find the fortune he's been searching for? (SPOILER ALERT: Yes.)

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And so it is that Scrooge McDuck finds the goose egg nugget that will kickstart his fortune. I think we'll pause here, because the next story is a big one, and we'd run out of space in the thread. Stay tuned for part 2 of the storytime, though, and please do keep the thread bumped for discussion or other readers!

>Smiling_Space_Marine.jpg

Praise the Emperor!

Bumpo

He was at a convention I went to earlier this month, he seems really nice. I bought an art print, the cover of the 5th volume, and he gave me a handshake

Also he brought this basket to his table that was full of his home grown spicy peppers. Guess that's his hobby now

Forgot picture

Based OP.

>glxblt
Blxglt?

This must be my favorite moment of "Angry Young Scrooge".

He did a PANEL? Man, he never does those and only ever mans his booth. What was it about?

Here's a sketch from Life and Times that his editor strangely told him to redo.

I wonder what his take on treasure hunting in the middle-east would look like today?

Alright, guys, I'm continuing the storytime with "The Prisoner of White Agony Creek" in a new thread.
Heh.

bump

Bump

Bump of Bumps!

Thanks OP, some parts of this story really gets tears in my eyes. I have the hardcover luxury edition, love every piece of it.

Also, kudos for you for posting the Tuomas songs along the story. These are simply perfect.

I've always wanted to buy this book, because it looks amazing, like all the old disney comics. But when I look it up to see how much it is, it's going for hundreds of dollars?! How are you supposed to obtain this book now?

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Thank you OP

The stories are being reprinted in Fantagraphics ongoing Don Rosa library volumes along with Don's other duck stuff.

They're still a bit pricey, but you still get more for your money than buying the OOP LaT volumes.

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This page is the perfect example of why I love Don Rosa : so many details and little jokes in one page, you discover something new everytime.

Bump.

reading bump

bump

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This one got archived. So I should ask here, do you have the comic were is Duckburg Xth aniversary?

Well, shit.

Only read parts of this before, thank you very much OP.

seconding this

what is this, a storytime for ants?

bump

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>Scrooge almost indifferent to losing his possessions
I'm not sure that's in character.

bump op is a gentleman

Am I the only one getting some very Jewish vibes from the mcducks?
>Driven away from their land
>Made a fortune on trade
>Somehow ended in poverty again
>Right now some of the most rich and powerful people on earth

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Can anyone even remotely stop Scrooge McDuck?

Don't fuck with the duck.

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>Europeans hated Don Rosa for turning Scrooge into a superhero
>This despite Paperinik existing

bumping so others can read this classic

Just finished the final chapter.

I was not ready. I heard this was good, but I wasn't expecting these feels

thanks a lot OP, saved everything!

>flood in the desert
Huh.

bump

If you'd like more feels, check out "Dream of a Lifetime", which I consider to be an unofficial epilogue to "Life and Times".

Inception also totally ripped off its premise from it.

Woah, does it really have that much resell value? I have some copies that I got when I was a kid at like Borders or something

IIRC, it's been out of print for years, so yeah, it's quite pricey. But very fitting, considering the subject matter.

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Read that in the third thread. A fitting end to this particular tale.

>posting from the soundtrack along with the comics

My nigga.

I want an ultimate edition. I want a leather-bound, archival paper god-tier edition of this book.

>saved everything
This is a really good idea, since this all seems so hard to find. It's not as if we have a zipped download anywhere, right?

Don't forget that the second half of this story is in this thread and it's already been archived, so you should save everything there before it's deleted.

There's a third thread?

Yeah, improperly linked in the second thread. OP posted 'Dream of a Lifetime' and the full version of 'Last Sled to Dawson' in that one for those who were interested.

It should still be in the archives.

I wonder what the new Ducktales will be like? If the new mickey cartoons are anything to go by, it should be good.

I found it, here

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I got my version of this signed by Don Rosa when I was 11. I wonder how much it would be worth if it wasn't a Danish edition.

Not that I'd ever sell it, but still.

I hope Scrooge's new VA ends up being just as good as Alan Young.

Man I love Don Rosa especially all the gags in the background. Did he make any other work without Scrooge? Like only Donald Duck for example?

>Did he make any other work without Scrooge? Like only Donald Duck for example?

Yes and yes. The fuck man, you haven't read anything besides this book or what?

Yeah. IIRC, he also wrote an episode of TaleSpin.

I used to read his work like crack when I was a kid but they only had his comics on scrooge in the library.

Shit, someone is still posting this? Dang, i don't even remember when i made it.

Doing God's work user. Just got my new Rosa book in yesterday.

got the book signed and everything m8

So, since these books are prohibitively expensive, does anyone have a MEGA link or something?

Buy Fantagraphic trades. Look them up online. The colors aren't as good, but supports Rosa. They have a bunch of Barks work too. Only $20 a book.

Didn't know it was recolored, why is that?

>The pages are colored by Rich Tommaso and Kneon Transitt under the supervision of Disney expert David Gerstein and Gary Groth, with the artistic input of Don Rosa as well. Rosa has stated that he checks every page and panel offering valuable insight and assistance to the Fantagraphics team in restoring the stories as they were originally intended to be published.

OK, so he wasn't satisfied with the initial coloring. I guess I always thought he did that himself, but I was wrong.

This does sound a little like George Lucas editing though..

Prefer whichever but something like this is more restoration than recolor. Rosa's clearly working pretty closely with this edition and that's not something that happened a lot in his career.

Well, as long as it looks good. I just haven't seen the Fantagraphics versions yet. But they seem like great collections anyway.

I really like the extra writing they put in by Rosa and others. The only shame is they put in some unnecessary gradients. Still worth the $20 for sure.

That'll work! $20 a book is way more reasonable than $100+ a book.

While we have a duck thread anyone read these? Anywhere near as good as Barks/Rosa? Trying to desides if they are worth collecting seeing they started putting out hardcovers.

You mean the IDW comics kind? Uncle Scrooge, Walt Disney's Comics and Stories, Donald Duck and Mickey Mouse.. Those issues contain a lot of Italian comics, some Dutch comics, some more American comics and probably lots of other countries' stories, and they are more hit or miss than Barks and Rosa. But there are lots of good ones, and IDW might just be publishing the best ones. Interesting artists are
Romano Scarpa
Giorgio Cavazzano
Mau Heymans
Marco Rota
William Van Horn
Daan Jippes
Daniel Branca
and that's just a few acclaimed Disney comics artists

IDW is also publishing the old newspaper funnies by Al Taliaferro, those are also classics. But expensive IIRC.
And Fantagraphics has the classic Mickey Mouse adventures by Floyd Gottfredson. That's Mickey at his best.

You should probably just try one out

I'm I have been interested in reading them, I might give them a try. Want to know how the translation and art look. The panels I've seen looks a little flat compared to Barks/Rosa. Haven't heard anything about the writing. Anyone read them?

Sure it's good but any Carl Barks story is better than this

I've only ever read one IDW Disney comics issue and it seemed on par with everything I've seen in Europe (I'm Dutch, but I've also read some German Disney comics). I think there's always the issue of translation with Disney comics because a lot are made in Italy, but translations are always good enough I think. At least as a kid I never noticed it, didn't even know those stories were Italian.

With the artists I mentioned in the previous post, I'm excited about all their art. Except maybe William Van Horn who is more known as a good writer than as a good artist. Other artists may have peaked for a decade and may have comics that aren't as impressive, but every one of those artists has something that makes them special. There are also, for instance, many artists I kind of dislike because their work is kind of ugly, or dull. I've seen too many Donald Duck stories published in the Netherlands that were made by Vicar, so I'm kind of bored by him. Also the work of old American artists like Al Hubbard and Tony Strobl kind of hurts my eyes. Carl Barks really was "the Good Duck Artist".

When the art is good, that doesn't guarantee good writing, but in most Disney publications I enjoy at least like 70% of the stories. Fans are often comparing to Barks and there are many stories that are considered to be as good as Barks stories. Unfortunately I don't think there's any Disney artist writing comics as detailed and deep as Don Rosa, but I hope I'm wrong about that.

Thank you for the insight, user. Well thought out.

Go away, Keno.

Loving the artstyle and the idea of the distinctions between the triplets, as well as the concept of going closer to Barks in tone. Really hoping that the animation will be more fluid than the Mickey shorts, though.

OP here. I pretty much had to piece the whole thing together from torrents, PDFs, and in the case of Bear Mountain, hunting through a Cred Forums archive for it. I can try and get a zipped download up if anyone's interested?

Yes, please.

>relatively accurate Series I Defender
The /o/ in me loves shit like this.

No problem!

I tried finding some images that show some of the artists I mentioned at their best. But it's hard to find quality images, at least with google.

And it's worth mentioning that when it comes to art, I've never seen another Disney artist making art like Don Rosa. Marco Rota does detailed backgrounds every now and then, but that's the only way you can compare them. And while many artists try to make simple, but powerful art like Barks did, a lot of them fail. A lot of them just try something completely different. It's something I really like about Disney comics, the different art styles.

This is Daniel Branca

This is from a story where Scrooge is paranoid about Magica being everywhere. I recognized this one, read it a long time ago.

Daan Jippes. He's way past his prime when it comes to drawing Ducks I think. But he's considered to be the artist closest to Barks.

Colors like these definitely get an update if they'd be published now. I do like those old colors though.

The text in this image is in Dutch btw.

Mau Heymans. His brother Bas also draws Duck comics.

Another one in Dutch

Finally, I'll share this one from Giorgio Cavazzano. A lot of Italian artists have a style similar to this. I think it's great

Thanks, man.
Branca's art in particular looks great.

Kek. I forgot how funny these are. Gotta find my old collections again.

I always liked the very fluid 'Italian' style. And a lot of those comics were centered around Donald or Mickey being in some sort of secret agent AU, which I always thought was cool as a kid. That and Paperinik, aka Donald Duck if he was the Batman.

there's that famous duck rage

not in rage mode

so good

Yeah Paperinik/Duck Avenger is cool. I don't really know PKNA. Got one book with PKNA stories once, but it didn't make an impression. I think I should try it again.

That's a cool cover btw. Reminds me of another awesome cover I recently saw on a Disney comics forum. From a Moby Dick (Duck, really) story.

>Got one book with PKNA stories once, but it didn't make an impression
I remember liking them as a kid. It has a very nostalgic 90's aesthetic with the futuristic setting and villain designs.

Thank You!

Thanks

bump

>It has a very nostalgic 90's aesthetic with the futuristic setting and villain designs.
Ha yeah, definitely

Speaking of stories with Scrooge going paranoid, does anyone who wrote this story which I read long time ago.

It is about Scrooge being stalked by a man in black in the Friday 13th, thinking something ominous will happen to him. Then the last pages reveal the man was only wanting to give Scrooge his number one dime back, which had fallen from his pocket. Scrooge goes back to his office in peace until Donald points him the calendar is wrong and that day wasn't Friday 13th, making Scrooge go superstitious again.

It amazes me how different Euro Disney is in regards to how they treat the characters and what's allowed in the comics. Look at those duck tits.

Tip toppest of keks

>I have been interested in reading [IDW Disney comics], I might give them a try. Want to know how the translation and art look. The panels I've seen looks a little flat compared to Barks/Rosa. Haven't heard anything about the writing. Anyone read them?

Here's a Mau Heymans-drawn story, "The Dashingest Dudebro," from IDW's Uncle Scrooge #18. I'll storytime the whole 14-page thing. Translation and dialogue is by Jonathan Gray, formerly of Sonic the Hedgehog, who's also a Disney scholar (he writes academic stuff for the Fantagraphics Disney books), and it shows.

(actually, this is issue #8, not #18)

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NEW THREAD:

NEW THREAD: (story continues there...)

Bump

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rising bump

Alright, this should have everything I posted in .cbr format:

Okay, this should have everything I posted in .cbr format:
mega.nz/#!HIo31bIZ
Anyone mind downloading and letting me know if it worked?

Requires the decryption key to download.

Shit. Sorry.
mega.nz/#!HIo31bIZ!qioW83NVaanQHyNoDugjmAUi6-ui2cyTWKE4agtoLUA
This work?

Yep. Thanks for fixing

Seems to work for me.

Thanks for all of this OP. Like I said, I've always wanted to read these comics, and now that I know how rare and expensive they've become, I'm even more grateful to get the whole collection.

I've also done storytimes of mine own, so I know it's not as easy as some anons might think, and I can't imagine keeping track of all this.

Still pisses me immensely off Don isn't recognized for his great work in his own home country AND that he was shat on by Disney in terms of getting properly paid.

>Hue

Well, rare and expensive.. The original 12 chapters of Life and Times have just been republished by Fantagraphics. 2 books, together that's $40. But I do think it's great that people are reading it here for free and find out how awesome Don Rosa is.

How does it happen that around 1950 Disney comics were the best selling comics in the US, and now it's so unpopular?

Comic demographics in America has changed from a massive audience of children to a smaller, mostly adult, crowd.

Donald Duck/Scrooge is still the current best selling weekly comic in Scandinavia and Germany though.

Scandis have a massive hard-on for Donald. Don Rosa is visiting a book and comics convention in Denmark next month to sign copies and sell prints, and the event has at least 500 fans showing up to have their stuff signed.

But how and when did children stop reading comics then? I mean, Disney comics and other comics suitable for kids have always been around right? In Europe there have always been new kids to pick up comics even when older kids grew up and might've stopped reading "kids comics".

I know about Scandinavia (), that's absolutely crazy. I once saw this video that shows a line for a Don Rosa signing booth. It's unbelievable.. youtube.com/watch?v=V1B7MBnFhdw

Dunno. I guess the big comic censorship that took place in the middle 50s in America has something to do with Cape-comics rising in popularity and being the 'default' thing to read. Kids are probably also more interested in other forms of entertainment today. Comics have to compete with both television and video games.

I wonder if stuff like Donald Duck is considered 'kiddy' even by kids, who'd rather be cool and read Spiderman/Batman.

Superheroes don't have the same pull in Europe, where most people grew up on Tintin and Asterix. They particularly like humor-based adventure comics with a lot of slapstick.

>that line.
>One old man having to sign all of that.
Holy shit. I wonder if he's maybe happy to take a break in his own country where barely anyone cares.

He doesn't even have the time to make a drawing!

Does he still draw? I thought his eyesight was sadly fucked.

Loved this story so much after finally reading it during a storytime a few years back I went out and bought the artists edition.


Totally worth it.

He still makes sketches and signs them for fans, but he doesn't have time for that in the places were people are crazy about him because there's too many, he just has to get the autographs down as fast as possible.

His eyesight is too fucked for him to do his highly detailed comics anymore though.

So now I'm wondering, does anyone have some of the great Mickey comics to storytime? Doesn't have to be right now of course, but maybe sometime soon? I'd love to see a thread like this for the other disney comics.

I will storytime MM #0 as soon as I get my Cred Forums pass

Donald is also deeply integrated in Scandinavian/Nothern European culture. He's one of the first fictional character most kids come to know, and seen as a sort of stable of childhood. See this sappy Finnish commercial for an example youtube.com/watch?v=XPPie0q0kjY

I'm, uh.

I'm lost.

On what user?

>2nd panel
right where the sun don't shine, damn.

>he tried to drive them into quicksand
even as a kid Scrooge was straight gangsta when it came to thieves

>Three aces and two aces

Such a dumb joke but I love it

Is interesting that for Boom Studios edition of Duble Duck have commisioned some exclusive cover from the italian artist.

Thread's autosaging and here I've got to be at work for the next 5 hours.

Dammit. Here's hoping it's still archived when i can get to it.

So, one of these girls is Donald's mother?

Actually has it ever been established who is in line to inherit Scrooge's wealth? Is it Donald? Is it the boys?

Donald is his closest living relative, but Scrooge isn't fool enough to not have a will...

According to this pic (image limit, here'e a link teachermuriel.eu/hotpot/duck_family_tree.jpg ), Hortense is his mother.

Oddly, their hair colors are reversed from this thread (Hortense as a blonde, Matilda as a brunette or redhead)

Bump.

Great work, OP.

>How Quackmore and Hortense are looking at each other

It's just like one of my Japanese animes

In fairness it sounds like the Dutch resident was just making shit up to get his money

>this whole page
Kek

Do we ever find out what was in Goldie's letter in another comic? And what was in the sled that got caught in the glacier?

>$10,000 of 1885 dollars would be worth: $250,000.00 in 2015

I mean that's not SCROOGE money but I'd say that's damn respectable of a start, enough to say he's rich at the moment.

According to the 1953 story "Some Heir Over the Rainbow," it's the boys. Scrooge was testing them, Donald, and Gladstone to see who should inherit the most, and Scrooge ended up so impressed by HDL that he didn't leave Gladstone or Donald anything.

Later stories kind of contradicted this one, but it's amusing, anyway.

Bumperoony

>Free Lunch Special Today
>$5

You're not going to ruse McDuck with something like that.

...also shouldn't it be in pounds sterling?

this is a great moment right here

other thread's closed

It looks like Donald HAS heard this story...

To be honest Don still lives a fairly comfortable life. I'd hate to be shafted by Disney like that but at least he didn't end up flat out broke.

this is where i stopped reading l&t bc i couldnt find the hidden d.u.c.k.

>Found the camera
FUCKING FINALLY

That poor man and his iron temper. RIP

>How does it happen that around 1950 Disney comics were the best selling comics in the US, and now it's so unpopular?
There's a lot of factors to that. I think one of the key ones is that people just don't know that they still exist.

Like maybe if they actually promoted these on the hundreds of social media pages they have and sell them at the Disney Stores and theme parks, then they might get more numbers out of them.

But the trade off for that would be rebooting the comics to the Mickey's Clubhouse universe. Gotta sell those hotdogs to all the pc child safe loving parents out there.

Yeah television and games made it difficult for comics. But it seems Disney comics were quite low in popularity before TV and games took off. I guess the 50s censorship made every kid that was interested in more "serious" and action-packed comics turn to superheroes, while before that happened, some of them were reading superhero stories, others were reading military stories, or detective stories, or horror stories. I can see how that made superheroes the best known and "default" comics, taking attention away from other popular comics like those by Disney.

Another reason often given for comics in American having a mostly adult audience, is that the threshold to buying comics is quite high right? Do only comic book shops sell weekly/monthly issues iirc? So kids don't get to see comics that often as in Europe perhaps. I think I read stuff on Cred Forums about Archie comics having a place in the supermarket, but is that the only one? Here in Europe I think most supermarkets with a magazine section have a bunch of Disney comics. They're the first comics most kids see. I feel like at least in the Netherlands younger kids don't really read Tintin and Asterix anymore by the way, but almost any kid has read a Donald Duck weekly at least once.

I can think of another reason why Disney comics didn't get to stay popular in the US, and that might be the lack of good comics. To me Carl Barks seemed pretty much like the only good artist appearing in those magazines, the comics by Tony Strobl, Jack Bradbury, etc. look awful imo. So there wasn't enough good material for years, and after Barks quit, the magazines just had mediocre comics and reprinted Barks stories. The publisher didn't yet get the new stories that started being made in Italy. But I'm just thinking out loud, don't know if any of this would be right.

Yeah it's hard to believe Disney can't do a better job in promoting these comics.

How different is that clubhouse universe to the current comics universe?
I do feel the upcoming DuckTales series could help bringing attention to the comics, but the art style of the series is way different than the comics. And I wouldn't care for comics in the style of the cartoon. (but I'm cautiously excited for the cartoon)

the first one it's in the knees

I've now got an itch to watch some Ducktales episodes. Anyone know where to find them in high quality? Or is kisscartoon the best we've got?

>How different is that clubhouse universe to the current comics universe?
Have you never seen it? It's nothing like the classic, scrappy Mickey at all.

Is the children a important character later?

>Anyone know where to find them in high quality?
The kat that kicks asses has DVD rips.

That's John Rockerduck, one of Scrooge's big rivals. Only showed up in one Barks story but he's big in Europe.

The demographic that watches Mickey Mouse Clubhouse is different from the demographic that would read comics and I'm sure Disney recognizes this. Disney has spent the past few years trying to restore Mickey to an actual character rather than a theme park icon which is why stuff like Epic Mickey and the newer shorts exist. The comics would certainly help with that if Disney gave them a chance.

>I think I read stuff on Cred Forums about Archie comics having a place in the supermarket, but is that the only one?
Archie has what they call digest comics which are cheap collections of reprints printed on low quality paper and in a small size. They have these for their main Archie characters and for Sonic The Hedgehog but no other publisher has anything like them so they're the only comics you ever see in supermarkets. This sort of thing falls in line with what I was saying about getting people to know about the comics. A Disney digest series in the same style would help get the ball rolling and there's an endless amount of material they could reprint for them.

>So there wasn't enough good material for years, and after Barks quit, the magazines just had mediocre comics and reprinted Barks stories. The publisher didn't yet get the new stories that started being made in Italy. But I'm just thinking out loud, don't know if any of this would be right.
This is true but it also stopped being the case after the 80's.

Bump for a great thread that's been here since thursday, when was the last time we had a quality thread last this long?

bump

American Rosa comics have shitty colouring jobs is why.

Hortense is blonde in the European versions to match Donald's sister. Everything else looks a lot better too, far more detailed shading and more natural colours.

Pretty sure the sled contained the deed to the money bin, or was it a receipt to some old debt? Either way, there's a story where he has to go back and get it and fights an old Soapy Slick.

John Rockerduck.

You can read more of him in recent issues in the IDW run going on now, European reprints.

In the Don Rosa Story where he goes back to find it, it turns out the most important item it had was a box of chocolates for Goldie. Because Don is a dirty shipper.

Yeah, and while he might now have the millions to show for it, he's recognized as a legendary Disney artist and writer in Europe.

I hadn't seen it, just watched a few seconds. Seems like something that stops being fun once you turn 5.
But this sounds good . Luckily Disney is doing other things with their classic characters as well.

Wow yeah, Disney comics would be perfect for such a digest series.

>This is true but it also stopped being the case after the 80's.
I figured. But Barks quit drawing in 1967 or something right? Looking on Inducks, it seems that Walt Disney's Comics and Stories/Donald Duck/Mickey Mouse/Uncle Scrooge didn't start featuring comics by non-Americans until 1986. From 1986 onward I see mentions of Daan Jippes, Daniel Branca and others. Also, Rosa started in the late 80s. But that means that for almost two decades Barks and Gottfredson *reprints* were the only good stories in American Disney comic books. That's pretty bad.

...

Shout-out to the guy in the other Scrooge thread who said to be the translator of a Dutch story. Great to see someone working on Disney comics here, didn't know that. You're still doing translation work? And do you visit any other Disney comics communities?

...

>he's recognized as a legendary Disney artist and writer in Europe.

He made some rough outlines to a story about the McDuck clan that never got finished.
In it it's mentioned how the McDucks worked with viking raiders and how there since then had been a good relationship between the clan and the nordic people. A fun and not-so-subtle way of recognizing how popular those characters are in Scandinavia.

Sometimes it's like Rosa can only draw inspiration from existing stories or real life occurrences. (50 years of Scrooge!/My comics are popular in Finland!/It's 50 years ago since the money bin and the Beagle Boys first appeared, let's make a story about them!) And yet when writing these stories based on something else, he's like the most creative guy ever.

>implying this thread will ever 404

This deserves a bump

>Yeah television and games made it difficult for comics. But it seems Disney comics were quite low in popularity before TV and games took off.

Disney comics in the late 1950s got more and more conservative and childish.

You're right about Tony Strobl and Jack Bradbury but at least as much because of the WRITING as because of the art (sometimes Bradbury, at least, was an excellent artist...)
In the mid-1950s Western's non-Barks comics seemed to drift into a miasma of proto-Scooby-Doo plots where a boring straight man/funny man team travel to a new place in every story, bump into boring crooks, fight with them and catch them. For extra credit, the crooks are occasionally disguised as monsters or ghosts, directly anticipating Hanna-barbera.

A very loyal audience stuck with the comics when they were like this, and will still tell you that Mickey done in this style is awesome. But the vast majority jumped ship and began reading Archie or Marvel as the Disneys sank more and more into this rut. In the late 1960s Strobl and Bradbury left and the art quality got truly excreable.
And they stayed awful like this through the end of the Gold Key/Whitman era in the mid-1980s, never using Italian stories or Danish or Dutch stories of what have you until the VERY end.

Other comics got good while Disneys got worse and worse.
Gladstone in the 1980s did an amazing job of recovering from this, but Gladstone in the 1990s drifted into a run of extremely boring reprints, and never recovered...
The new IDW comics are good but the line has suffered for so long.

>Shout-out to the guy in the other Scrooge thread who said to be the translator of a Dutch story. Great to see someone working on Disney comics here, didn't know that. You're still doing translation work? And do you visit any other Disney comics communities?

Yep. These days I'm Archival Editor of the present IDW comics and series editor of the Fantagraphics Gottfredson and Rosa hardbacks.
I still do some translations too, though I've got a team working with me who handle most of them (and put in a ton of love... Jon Gray, formerly of Sonic, is our lead guy, and Thad Komorowski is another... Gary Leach and Joe Torcivia of Gemstone days are with us too).

If you'd like to see a new translation from me, Freddy Milton's long adventure "The Big Sneeze" is finally out in the USA this week (in Donald Duck #17)—it's from the Gladstone I era, but for a number of reasons was never published here till now.

i feel like giving it a look tomorrow, so that

>not holding her by her ankles below dress
I mean, she could've hide the dime under her underskirt

>But that means that for almost two decades Barks and Gottfredson *reprints* were the only good stories in American Disney comic books. That's pretty bad.
Keep in mind that those are the same two decades where Walt Disney died and the animation studio had been suffering. It was when everything else got better that the comics started getting better.

bump

He's a gentleman

>please don't think I've suddenly become infatuated with Magica DeSpell
Rosa pls. We knew that already.

>If you don't like my stories then don't read them, problem solved
Rosa is pretty based. A lot of today's creators could benefit from adopting that mindset instead of trying to fight back against their critics.

Sounds like a pretty cool job. What does an archival editor do exactly? Adding and taking things from the archive? Because with all the new stories IDW is printing, it's mostly adding to your archive I guess.

I've only read a few American Disney publications, but I enjoy the editor's notes and how passionate you all are.

Did you translate The Big Sneeze from Dutch? According to Inducks it was first published in the Netherlands. It would be fun to compare your translation to the original, but I would have to get my hands on both versions. In ieder geval leuk dat je blijkbaar goed bent met Nederlands, haha.

Are there any communities you can recommend that discuss Disney comics? I know a few sites, but there might be some I've never heard of.

>>Are there any communities you can recommend that discuss Disney comics?
the feathery society and Italian communities like Papersera

I don't remember being excited about the writing in Strobl/Bradbury/Hubbard-drawn comics either.
>In the late 1960s Strobl and Bradbury left and the art quality got truly excreable.
Hm, looking at some images of other artists' work on Inducks, Strobl and Bradbury might not be the worst, but to me pretty much all artists from that time except Barks and Taliaferro made weird looking Ducks. I guess the fact that it looks dated makes it worse for me. To kids of the 50s, 60s it might have been a lot better.

But about the writing, I didn't realize it got that bad. I know what kind of Mickey Mouse comics you're talking about, they're not fun anymore after you've read a few of them. For years the Dutch weekly Disney magazine only published Mickey Mouse comics by Paul Murry. And this was after 2000. When visiting Germany I noticed they had *modern* looking Mickey stories in their magazine, by Noel Van Horn for instance. I think what the Dutch editors did with their selection of comics actually turned Dutch readers off of Mickey Mouse. I actually do like a Paul Murry Mickey comic every now and then, but as with Vicar, the Dutch Disney publisher wouldn't stop printing them. Bleh.

I was thinking how years of reprinting Disney comics in the 70s and 80s wouldn't necessarily be bad when many of these stories were loved before. But I can see how that made Disney comics outdated and out-of-style. That makes a lot of sense how the readers wanted to read the more modern Archie and Marvel instead.

Crazy how Disney and the comics publishers didn't change things around sooner, but I guess they were in some crisis or whatever and went with the cheapest options.

>Gladstone in the 1980s did an amazing job of recovering from this, but Gladstone in the 1990s drifted into a run of extremely boring reprints, and never recovered...
>The new IDW comics are good but the line has suffered for so long.

How bad was it wat Gladstone did in the 90s? Skimming through Inducks I see issues with a few reprints next to new stuff (also from Rosa), that can't be that bad right?

And I just looked on the Wikipedia page for Disney comics and it sure changed a lot of times who published them in the US. I'm convinced IDW is doing a good job with it, so let's hope you can continue doing what you're doing. What do you think of ideas like those mentioned here:

>Like maybe if they actually promoted these on the hundreds of social media pages they have and sell them at the Disney Stores and theme parks, then they might get more numbers out of them.
>Archie has what they call digest comics which are cheap collections of reprints printed on low quality paper and in a small size. They have these for their main Archie characters and for Sonic The Hedgehog but no other publisher has anything like them so they're the only comics you ever see in supermarkets. This sort of thing falls in line with what I was saying about getting people to know about the comics. A Disney digest series in the same style would help get the ball rolling and there's an endless amount of material they could reprint for them.

Although I wouldn't know if you or any of the people you work with actually have a say in this. Both ideas seem pretty good to me, probably because I'm used to seeing lots of Disney comics at Dutch supermarkets. Including digest type comic books.
If any of these ideas would mean you have to change the kind of comics you're printing in WDCS, DD, US and MM right now, that would suck though.

Thanks, already know the Feathery society though, and the English subforum of Papersera is pretty inactive so it seems.

At first I didn't like the style of them.
It looked too silly, but now I appreciate it.

alright, let's break down all the things that are good about this aloon scene.
>Horse on the second floor
>Massive amounts of spit on the "Please use Spitoon" sign
>All the people gathered around on mans poker hand
>The guy who's table is in the middle of breaking
>The person who apparently ran full tilt into a pillar 5 feet in the air
>The guy who gets slammed as Scrooge opens the door

Such good art

Any examples of the different colours in Yuro versions? I'm interested to see the difference now.

Wait, is that thing with trees real?

Yup.

youtube.com/watch?v=hDaai0z-2NY

...

Haha, I can imagine.
It's an unusual style for Ducks, but it was easy to get used to it as it was one of the styles I grew up with. He's one of my favorite Disney artists.